Tips in using the iOS 7 Safari

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iOS 7 SafariAs the iOS 7 arrives to various iDevices, a lot of changes have been made especially for Safari, Apple’s dedicated internet browser. Although its layout and interface has been improved, using it for the first time can be challenging especially with the recent changes. To help you out, here is a list of tips and tricks that you should learn before searching in this newly enhanced Safari browser.

Password storage

According to Macworld, this updated browser can now store information pertaining to passwords and even credit card numbers. Moreover, it also has a built-in capability wherein it can generate passwords for you. This will be tied to Apple’s iCloud Keychain – a cloud vault for safely keeping all user’s vital information.  According to the posts from the O2 community page, you can activate this feature by visiting the Safari tab on the Settings app on your device. In the Passwords and Autofill section, swipe the “always allow toggle on” button.

**To learn more about the iOS 7’s password settings, you can visit : http://www.o2.co.uk.

Private browsing and Do not Track settings

Private surfing is a vital feature of any web browser because it allows you to keep internet activities hidden. However, activating it is time-consuming because of all the numerous steps that you have to follow.  Now, this secret searching mode is just one tap away. All you have to do is scroll down at the bottom of your tabs and hit the “Private” button.

Another feature that users will definitely enjoy is the Do not Track settings. Using this mode, websites will not be able to track your browsing habits so vital information about your online history is safe. To activate it, launch the Settings App and open the Safari page. In the Privacy & Security tab, flip the switch in the Do Not Track section.

One unified search bar

Before, you need to type in two separate text fields when you want to enter a website address or if you need to look for information. With this new browser, these two fields are merged into one and are known as Smart Search Field to make your browsing quicker. Furthermore, the new iOS has the ability to suggest the most searched items on the internet based on the keywords that you entered. If you know how the Google Chrome’s Omnibox works, then you won’t have a problem coping with this change.

With the new smart search bar, you will also notice that the “.com” button is nowhere to be seen. Don’t fret because this nifty shortcut can now be found in the period key. Just tap and hold it until the default extensions appear.

Thanks to the iOS 7 upgrade, exploring information online using our iDevices has never been so efficient and fun. With its new security system, we can ensure that important data about us will not be easily stolen by others. If you want to learn more about the various online surfing tips, you can read this post about essential searching tips on the internet.

Do you know other iOS 7 tips that you can share with  other Apple enthusiasts? Feel free to share them  below.

 

 

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The Gamification of Apps

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APpsApps are rapidly turning into games. Obviously, apps that are already games aren’t what we’re talking about, here – instead, it’s apps that are designed without gaming in mind that are being influenced by games and their ability to incentivize the way we engage with them. These days, you’re just as likely to level up in a social check-in app as you are in an RPG – and that’s fantastic.

It has however been suggested that this may be the wrong approach – that so many apps are gamififying their mechanics to the point where it’s impossible to find a social iPhone app that works straightforwardly, rather than constantly awards you badges and experience points. While these incentives do reward users, apps should retain some level of purity, and as Ingrid Lunden states, this approach means that “many of the apps using the technique are becoming noise themselves.”

It’s true – play a session of Angry Birds and all the mechanics fit because you’re playing a game. But if you then start to find star ratings and unlocks inside your banking app, it’s not unlikely that the app will not be as efficient or fully-featured as it could be because the incentives have begun to replace the actual features.

Foursquare is definitely a service that worked very well and had a noticeable presence when it first launched, but these days it’s easy to feel that someone’s a bit odd when they’re still auto-tweeting the fact they’ve become Mayor of their local Starbucks in 2013. The reason for this is that while the app had medals and various accomplishments, it was essentially built around its gamification mechanics and offered little else – there was no real need to have a service to tell people where you were unless you were really keen on helping burglars.

The ideal approach to gamification would be to appreciate why you might need it, as if you have to give people badges and experience points to use your app, it might be worth considering that the app by itself lacks incentives for extended or regular use. Perhaps the best approach for all of these gamified apps appearing on the marketplace would be for us to only opt for those what would be great to start with, rather than ones where we’re paying for an app, just for mechanics that exist in a thousand other ones.

Gartner, the information technology research and advisory firm, recently published a report stating that gamified apps are going to fail 80% of the time if your reason for involving game mechanics in your software is purely due to novelty and hype. If all of those badges and points have no real meaning or use, then you’re just adding noise to a quiet room. These are wise words, and it’s definitely something to consider as a consumer – if you’re paying for apps, try and opt for the ones where gamification is used intelligently and really rewards you – don’t be fooled by shiny stickers.

 

Facebook Heads arrives for iPhone and iPad

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After the long wait, iOS users can now enjoy the new Facebook chat option where you can see a picture of your contacts in a bubble-shaped icon whenever they message you. Although the Facebook Chat Heads is one of the primary features of the Facebook Home for Android, Apple device users will now receive this feature with the recent mobile updates.

At the All Things D mobile event held this week, Facebook chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer and Mobile Engineering vice president Cory Ondrejka made an official announcement that the quirky messaging experience on the Facebook Home will now be available to iPhone and iPad.

In the article published by Mashable.com, Facebook said that “iPhone users who download the update will start to see Chat Heads pop up over the next couple of weeks.”

Creating a more playful and dynamic messaging interface, the Chat Heads were designed to show the profile picture of your contacts that signifies a new message thread. The pictures appear in a floating bubble-like heads on your screen. Users will need to click on the picture in order to open the message thread.

So, what’s the difference between the Chat Heads for Android and iOS? Without the interface, the Facebook Heads will only work inside the application, unlike in Android, where users can interact with their Facebook directly on their Home page, as explained by the Facebook executives.

The new Facebook app will soon be available on the Apple’s App Store, although the Chat Heads might take a few weeks to reach other users. The new version will have bigger and bolder News Feed design and will introduce digital stickers to the messaging system.

The integration of Chat Heads to the iOS app does not indicate that the Facebook Home will be available for Apple devices. Facebook is sill focused on targeting the larger market of Android users. Recently, the new Facebook-centric UI become available in the United States, giving Android Smartphone users more access to their favorite social site. The new UI is now available for the Samsung Galaxy SIII, the Samsung Galaxy Note II, the HTC One X, and the HTX One X+. We will also expect the upcoming Samsung Galaxy SIV and HTC One to have the Facebook Home interface, but for now, HTC First, which will be out on the international market later this year, will be the first device to carry the full interface.

Facebook HEadsIf you enjoy accessing your Facebook profile and connecting with your friends to this social page, then the Facebook Home will be your best option, as long as you have an Android device. Since the Facebook Home for Android might take a few more months to be released, it seems you’ll find the upcoming HTC First with pre-installed Facebook Home, a great Smartphone to buy, although you might find its specs disappointing.

Although talks about the Facebook Home continue to spread, early reviews showed a bad start for the UI considering it only has an overall average of 2.4 Stars on Google Play since its debut. However, we cannot purely judge the interface just yet; Facebook Home still has a lot more to run with the release of its first mobile, HTC First.